Think about the previous discussion question. What questions are missing, considering Morris Suzuki’s description of how former colonial subjects were treated following surrender?

In the previous discussion, we talked about how the Japanese and US governments were quick to see each others as allies after the war. However, one question that was missing was what happened to Japan’s relationship with the eastern nations after the war, and considering racial animosity comparable to that towards Americans and Westerners in general, was there prolonged racial animosity towards other Eastern people? Morris Suzuki explains how former colonial subjects, particularly migrants from other countries, were alienated and treated unfairly, as well as sometimes being forced to leave the country. They were treated as “invisible” immigrants, and were persecuted off of the mainland. Therefore, we must ask why they were treated so unfairly following surrender, and what became of these people.

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How does “Diary of a Housewife” complicate your understanding of the Japanese wartime experience? What does it reveal about the relationship between city and countryside?

“Diary of a Housewife” complicated my understanding of the Japanese wartime experience because I was able to see how gruesome and drastic the measures normal Japanese citizens had to take in order to contribute to the war effort. Farmers had to sell their produce in the black market, kids were evacuated away from their homes, and people who were recovering from war injuries were shipped away inhumanely back to the frontlines. City people had to create relationships with those in the countryside in order to evacuate, as it was much safer and the conditions were better in the countryside.

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